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Painting gothic numerals...


p34ce

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Do any of you fine ladies or gentlemen have any experience freehanding the gothic-style numerals often seen on the kneeplates of marines?

 

I'm at the stage now where I'm adding this sort of detail to the bulk of my PA troops. I don't want to use the typical Blood Angels style squad markings (ugly, too complicated), so I was thinking of doing nice numbers instead.

 

What I'm debating right now is if I should just get a custom decal sheet done in the right scale (from someone who can do that), instead of messing around with a brush.

 

Any advice/comments appreciated.

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Does a FW sheet have the size you need?

 

Alternately: grab a tiny tip micron pen. I use http://www.amazon.com/Prismacolor-Premier-Illustration-Markers-Black/dp/B002YKUF1I/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&qid=1376175430&sr=8-5&keywords=prismacolor+.005 and for a lot of freehand like that, or small checkered patterns, it works a treat!

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Yeh I have 0.1 and 0.3 pens that I used to use to panel line Gundam kits, but I don't like the way the ink looks when it's used over paint. The Forge World sheets are utterly useless, they always have too much of one thing and not enough of another, and for £11, I'd expect a whole sheet. I might ask Winterdyne, he did me a sheet before, for a reasonable cost.

 

Of course the sheet actually has to exist first :).

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To be honest, you're probably better off freehanding with a fine point brush.

 

The trick to doing numbers (or letters) is to remember you're painting, not writing. Your stroke direction is going to change and you need to get it in your head that multiple strokes may be needed for a line, and that you construct each letter or number slowly. Usually the 'gothicness' comes from serifs (the blobs or lines at the end of a line) or lines through. You'll generally add these after the letter or number is fully drawn. For split lines (like where there's an inset of the base colour) this can sometimes be most easily done by painting with the base colour (or a good opaque approximation), sometimes not. It's very situational.

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Lol! Thanks, actually winterdyne.

 

That's what I had in mind, and I've a fine as balls Kolinsky to do it with. I get antsy about freehanding on top of already painted/highlighted models, makes me nervous as hell.

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Practice with really thin paint; if you're nervous you want to work very translucently till you build up the skill. Remember - thin paint means not overloading your brush, or you'll end up with it running everywhere. It really is all about the brush control.

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